British GQ Profiles Louise Trotter, Lacoste’s Creative Director

Lacoste Heritage LogoBritish GQ has come out with a lengthy interview with Louise Trotter, Lacoste’s current creative director. In the introduction, they discuss her initial two collections:

Where Trotter’s first collection for Lacoste, AW19, set her pared-back, fashioned-up intention for the brand, it’s really her SS20 collection, mounted back in September and is in stores now, that proved her acute understanding of what the label, which has seemed unsure of its footing in recent years, should be in the 21st century.

From clever plays on Lacoste’s sporting heritage (think preppy knitted polo shirts with exaggerated collars and chunky cricket sweaters teamed with spearmint suiting) to modernised takes on classic Gallic pieces (slick wet-look trench coats and voluminous Bengal stripe shirts furnished with oversized crocodile motifs, for instance), there was plenty to snap up.

The interview is very enlightening on Trotter’s take on the Lacoste brand and her plans for the fashion label. Read more at British GQ.

Meanwhile, Trotter’s predecessor, Felipe Oliveira Baptista, has just released new sneakers in collaboration with VANs for the Kenzo brand he now heads. See Nylon.com for more.

Looking Back At Lacoste’s Fall 2020 Ready-To-Wear Collection

Lacoste Store WindowEven though Covid-19 is dominating the news, we’re trying not to forget about fashion. So, here’s a look back at Vogue’s review of Lacoste’s Fall 2020 ready-to-wear collection.  In Vogue’s words:

Golf bags, kiltie loafers, and putting-green argyles were all over the Lacoste fall 2020 runway. No, Louise Trotter has not abandoned the brand’s tennis heritage for its neighboring sport at the country club—through these golf-inspired pieces, she is paying homage to René Lacoste’s wife, Simone de la Chaume, a champion golfer whose legacy has been overshadowed by her husband’s embroidered gator. In De la Chaume’s heyday in the 1920s, shin-grazing pleated skirts and deep-V knitwear constituted the on-green look for women; here, Trotter refigured these silhouettes to be lighter, breezier, and in flashes of pastel colors. Styled as total looks—that totally evoke stylist Suzanne Koller’s own wardrobe—these golfing ensembles had a quirkily modern feel without veering too far into costume, even if the miniature golf bags came a little close.

Read more on the collection at Vogue.