Lacoste Goes After Counterfeit Goods in India

Editor’s Note: As always, the counterfeit Lacoste keeps coming, so before you buy make sure you check out my articles on detecting fake Lacoste shirts and detecting fake Lacoste bags, or my detailed discussion of how to authenticate Lacoste.

Lacoste scored a victory over counterfeiters in India. The World Trademark Review reports:

Lacoste S.A has prevailed in a counterfeit court case brought against two Noida-based firms for the sale of counterfeit Lacoste products. The win, in the Patiala House Court, marks the culmination of a three-year legal battle with the two infringing firms, which were ordered to cease the sale of counterfeit Lacoste goods and pay damages to the company on account of loss to goodwill and reputation suffered from the sale of fakes. The suit was filed against M/s Fashion Zone and M/s Export Hut, which were using the LACOSTE mark, along with the crocodile logo. The court accepted the suit and appointed the local commissioner to carry out search and seizure actions on the infringing firm’s premises.

One of the counterfeiters was fined one hundred thousand Rupees and both were required to forswear further counterfeiting.

Lacoste Agrees To Stop Using Mohair

Plant Based News reports that in response to video footage shot by PETA Asia, Lacoste has agreed to stop using mohair.

PETA’s footage shows goats being dragged by the horns and legs, and being sheared so quickly, they are left with gaping wounds. Some are shown being killed – one animal has their head hacked off with a dull knife. 
“PETA’s exposé has pulled back the curtain on the violent mohair industry, and Lacoste has made the commendable decision to implement a total ban on the material,” PETA Director, Elisa Allen, said in a statement sent to Plant Based News
“In doing so, the company joins the ever-growing list of fashion brands that have realised that cruelty to animals is not in fashion.”

You can read more about Lacoste’s decision here.

Lacoste’s New Head of UK and Ireland Is Jamie Givens

Lacoste BarcelonaAccording to Fashion United UK, Lacoste has confirmed the appointment of Jamie Givens as their new Chief Executive for the UK and Ireland:

Givens, who joins Lacoste from Levi’s, where he has spent 8 years in various senior positions in sales and marketing, has been tasked with accelerating the growth of the UK and Ireland business, whilst further strengthening Lacoste premium casual wear positioning, said the brand in a statement.

Lacoste added that Givens brings with him a “solid brand development expertise across various markets and channels,” as he has previously held both regional and global responsibilities across wholesale, retail and marketing for brands including Dockers, where he was commercial director for the UK, Benelux and Scandinavia, Tigi and Dim.

As Fashion United notes, this appointment follows that of British designer, Louise Trotter as Lacoste’s Creative Director

More Fake Lacoste Seized in South Africa

Carnaby EvoEditor’s Note: As always, the counterfeit Lacoste keeps coming, so before you buy make sure you check out my articles on detecting fake Lacoste shirts and detecting fake Lacoste bags, or my detailed discussion of how to authenticate Lacoste.

In early November, authorities in South African Customs officials seized a large amount of fake Lacoste shoes. Here’s their statement on the issue:

SARS Customs officials intercepted suspected counterfeit clothing and shoes valued at approximately R10 722 364 in the Western Cape over the weekend. The incident happened during a special high-visibility operation at Rawsonville Weighbridge off the N1 – 20 km south of Worcester on Saturday. The operation saw traffic and Customs officials redirecting all trucks carrying goods from the N1 to the Weighbridge, in order to detect possible illicit goods and collect all revenue due. Customs officials decided to search a truck carrying two vessel containers, one 20ft, the other 40ft, en route to Johannesburg from Cape Town. After opening the 20ft container, officers discovered what seemed to be second-hand truck tyres and rims. They then opened the 40ft container where they found heavy machinery, heavy boxes of unbranded goods, rubber sheets etc. However, further inspections revealed boxes containing branded clothing and footwear hidden at the back of the container. There were a total of 86 boxes containing the following brands and quantities:

* 1500 pairs Lacoste Takkies

* 2200 pairs Nike Takkies

* 1936 Adidas T-shirts

* 96 pairs John Foster shoes

The goods were confiscated and detained for further investigation.

Why Is Lacoste So Popular In the Philippines?

Lacoste Store WindowOver thirty-two percent of Lacosted‘s traffic comes from the Philippines, making it the largest source of traffic for this blog. Almost all of that traffic is either to my post on detecting counterfeit Lacoste shirts or the one on identifying fake women’s bags. Apparently, there is a lot of fake Lacoste out there, which is not surprising when a Lacoste shirt can cost over P4,000.  In any event, once I realized how much traffic I was getting from the Philippines, I did some research into why Lacoste is so popular there.

Lacoste’s popularity in the Philippines is mainly due to the brand’s long presence (it was introduced in the 1970s), and it’s association with the upper classes.  The brand has phenomenal penetration in the Philippines with around ninety-eight percent brand recognition in surveys, and the Philippines is considered the benchmark Asian market for Lacoste.  While Lacoste’s customers are mainly more affluent Filipinos, it continues to increase its sales as an aspirational brand for the less affluent.