Lacoste Introduces New “Eco-Friendly,” “Closed Loop” Polo Shirt

Red Leather Lacoste LogoIf you are into buzz words, you will love Lacoste’s new  “Eco-Friendly,” “Closed-Loop” polo shirt of which no two are identical. WWD has the details:

Lacoste is bringing a sustainable twist to its classic bestseller by introducing the Loop Polo. The eco-friendly polo shirt is made of 30 percent recycled cotton spun together with 70 percent virgin cotton; it is unisex.

Lacoste’s Loop Polo is made using a “closed-loop” process, which means no two polos are identical. It comes in a speckled look in heather gray or midnight blue. It has a “petit pique” texture, two-button neckline, short sleeves and tonal croc camouflage [logo], made from recycled polyester.

The manufacturing process also consumes less water. For more details, got to WWD.  The shirt is available as of today online and in Lacoste Stores. More coverage at Fashion United UK.

 

Lacoste Expanding E-Commerce Coverage To Kuwait, Qatar and Egypt

Esquire reports that Lacoste is expanding its e-commerce coverage in the Middle East and the Gulf:

Looking to grow its regional offering Lacoste has expanded its e-commerce offering to Kuwait, Qatar and Egypt, promising free delivery with 48 hours.

The launch of the service in the three countries will offer the full range of Lacoste collections for both men and women including Lacoste mainline, Lacoste L!VE and Lacoste sport.

In addition, the ecommerce site will feature a wide variety of products in varying categories such as apparel, shoes, leather goods and accessories.

Lacoste Joins The Boycott of Mohair

Live Kindly, reports that Lacoste has joined the PETA inspired boycott of mohair by the fashion industry:

According to international animal rights organization PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), Lacoste, along with Fast Retailing Co. – which owns a number of brands including Theory and Helmut Lang – banned mohair following the release of an exposé on the industry.

The exposé was filmed in South Africa, where half of the world’s mohair is sourced. It showed shearers – who are paid according to the amount of wool they produce and not hourly – rush through their work carelessly, leaving goats with painful open wounds. For animals who were no longer needed, workers sometimes cut their throats while still conscious.

Previously, Lacoste had agreed not to use Angora or Fur in its products.

Lacoste And French Advertising Company BETC Are Collaborating to Promote French Charity Apprentis d’Auteuil

B&T Magazine reports that:

“Lacoste and French advertising company BETC are ending 2020 by setting up an operation in favour of Apprentis d’Auteuil, a French association that has been working since 1866 for the education, training, and social and professional integration of young people throughout France.

Between 14 and 20 December, all orders sent to France from Lacoste.com will include a delivery slip for Apprentis d’Auteuil. This voucher will allow consumers to send one or more items of clothing to the association, from any brand, free of charge.”

Read more at B&T Magazine, or watch BETC’s and Lacoste’s Youtube video below:

Deciphering The Information on a Genuine Lacoste Price Tag

If you buy a legitimate Lacoste original polo shirt, it’s price tag should have a model number or code that is made up of four different parts.

For men’s shirts, the model number should begin with a code representing the design. For the original, cotton polo shirt, that design code should be one of the following:

  • L1212 – short sleeve pique
  • L1312 – long sleeve pique

For women’s original, cotton pol shirts, the model number should begin with one of these design codes:

  • PF168 or PF168E – short sleeve stretch pique
  • PF368E – classic long sleeve pique

For Lacoste items other than the original polo shirts, there are multiple other design codes, but they are all generally being with one or two letter combined with a number.

The next part of the model number  is a two digit number representing where the shirt is manufactured. In the US, it is almost always 51, meaning the shirt was made in Peru.  There are different numbers for India and Europe.

The third part of the model number is a three digit or three letter code representing the color. Some examples of colors are:

001 – white
031 – black
166 – navy
107 – yellow
240 – red
132 – green
476 – bordeaux
TO3 – flamingo
NSX – lawn green
TO1 – till blue
8LX – pearl
NXU – coastal blue
CBK – aegean blue

It’s important to realize, though, that there are numerous color and color combination codes, so this list is far from complete. For example, the DWW color code shown in the label above stands for black/white, white and graphite pattern on a color-block polo.

Lastly, there is a two digit code representing the size, as follows:

T3 – XS
T4 – S
T5 – M
T6 – L
T7 – XL
T8 – XXL

Thus, for example, a Men’s short sleeve, pique yellow, made in Peru, size small polo shirt label should read: L1212 51 107 T4

Some examples of tags are shown below.

Lacoste Tag

Editors Note

I’ve updated this article for 2021, since it is so popular. For detailed information on how to detect counterfeit Lacoste, see my posts on detecting fake Lacoste polo shirts, detecting fake Lacoste bags, and detecting fake Lacoste sneakers. I also have a page with more general tips on detecting Lacoste knock-offs.